Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Tucson AZ
September 10, 2015 11:59 am
I work at a dog kennel and I have I have found a lot of them out in my dog runs I Just want to make sure they are not poisonous.
Signature: Jonathan

Hubbard's Silkmoth Caterpillar

Hubbard’s Silkmoth Caterpillar

Good morning Jonathan,
This is a pre-pupal caterpillar from a moth in the genus
Sphingicampa, formerly Syssphinx, and we suspect it is most likely a Hubbard’s Silkmoth, Sphingicampa hubbardi, though another species, Sphingicampa raspa, is also found in Arizona.  According to BugGuide, the Hubbard’s Silkmoth:  “Larvae feed on Wright’s acacia, honey mesquite and catclaw acacia.”  They are not poisonous.

Subject: blueberry defoliator
Location: Jaffrey, New Hampshire
September 10, 2015 8:37 pm
One of my blueberry bushes had a bunch of these
Signature: Doug

Red Humped Caterpillar

Red Humped Caterpillar

Dear Doug,
Your caterpillar is
Schizura concinna and it goes by the very descriptive name Red Humped Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a wide range of woody plants, from many different families.”  Interestingly, we have not found any other mention of Red Humped Caterpillars feeding on blueberries.

Thank you Daniel!  That was a bunch of very impressive caterpillars and they finished the job on that poor blueberry.

Subject: Dark Hornworm
Location: Lake Ann Michigan
September 9, 2015 1:16 pm
Found both the normal green hornworm and the almost black one on 8/17/14 just 3 miles south of the Village of Lake Ann, Michigan. zip code 49643.
The darker one was much more aggresive, vibrated and emitted an odd noise when handled even slightly.
Found a total of 4 that year.
Signature: Bryan Black

Tobacco Hornworms:  Dark and Light Morphs

Dark Tomato Hornworm and Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Bryan,
Though they were both probably feeding on Tomato Plants, your two Hornworms represent different species in the same genus.  The dark Hornworm is a dark morph of a Tomato Hornworm,
Manduca quinquemaculatus, and the green Hornworm is a Tobacco Hornworm, Manduca sexta.  It is very curious that the Tomato Hornworm was the more aggressive of the two.

Subject: fanged moth caterpillar!
Location: southern Michigan
September 8, 2015 9:29 am
This is one scary-looking dude! Take a look at those “fangs” and that defensive posture!! Can you tell me what it is? A friend of mine found it in southern Michigan in July, and asked me to share it with anybody who might help identify it. Big thanks for everything you guys do!
Signature: LM – Michigan

Cutworm

Cutworm

Dear LM – Michigan,
This is a Cutworm in the subfamily Noctuinae, but we are uncertain of the species.  Though we believe it is not the Caterpillar of a Yellow Underwing, we think you should see the similarities to the head on this individual posted to BugGuide.  The terminal prolegs are especially distinctive.  You can try browsing BugGuide for a more specific identification.

Cutworm

Cutworm

Subject: Is this a momma with her babies?
Location: Holly Springs, MS.
September 6, 2015 6:36 pm
Hi Bugman!
I saw these little white “things” on my boxwood bush and thought for a split second something had flowered. Upon closer inspection this was a large green caterpillar with a serious looking spike on its tail. I wondered if these are babies attached to her? She was VERY AGGRESSIVE when I tried to handle her. I carefully placed her back on the bush after these pics!
Signature: Stephanie Berry (former bug queen of the day)

Hornworm Parasitized by Braconids

Hornworm Parasitized by Braconids

Dear Stephanie,
Your caterpillar is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae, and as the caterpillar is a larva, it is not able to reproduce until it becomes a winged adult moth.  This Hornworm has been parasitized by a Braconid Wasp, and the white “things” are the wasp pupae.  The larval Braconid Wasps have been internally feeding on the Hornworm, which is eaten alive.  The adult Braconid Wasps will soon emerge and the Hornworm will die before becoming an adult.  We have not been able to identify the species of Hornworm and we cannot find any information on Hornworms feeding on Boxwood.

Thank you for all the wonderful information!  That’s so sad that the caterpillar was being eaten alive 🙁
I’ve lived here almost 13 years and this is the first time I’ve seen one of these.
Thank you for all you do!!

Subject: Very Strange Bug
Location: Clinton, Ohio
September 5, 2015 12:26 pm
I found this today on my compost lid. The bug looks like it is wearing a lime green coat with a white fringe. It also looks like it has large lime green eyes and a red nose unless I am looking at the back end of that bug.
Signature: J. Alberts

Saddleback Caterpillar

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear J. Alberts,
This distinctive caterpillar is called a Saddleback Caterpillar,
Acharia stimulea, and it should be handled with caution because they are capable of stinging.