Currently viewing the category: "moth caterpillars"

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Central PA
Date: 09/04/2021
Time: 01:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this poisonous? What type of caterpillar is this?
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Jeff,
This is a Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar and it poses no threat to humans unlike other caterpillars that are known to sting.  Insects that feed on milkweed are able to incorporate toxins which make them distasteful or possibly even toxic to predators that eat them.

Subject:  1inch worm with stickers
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Pierce Florida
Date: 09/10/2021
Time: 06:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  He was eatting a leaf from bird of paradise.
How you want your letter signed:  Vickie

Saddleback Caterpillar

Dear Vickie,
This is a Saddleback Caterpillar and we did not know they feed on bird of paradise.  According to BugGuide they feed on:  “
Many trees, shrubs, and grasses including apple, asters, blueberries, citrus, corn, dogwoods, elms, grapes, linden, maples, oaks, Prunus species, sunflowers and viburnums. Troy has personally seen them feeding on liriope, cherry, oak, and holly.”  Handle with caution.  The Saddleback Caterpillar has stinging spines.

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Mimbres, New Mexico
Date: 09/11/2021
Time: 07:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these caterpillars – about 3 inches long – on my Oak tree.
Lots of them!  What are they?
How you want your letter signed:  Urbanohno

Cecrops Eyed Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Urbanohno,
What a marvelous find.  These are caterpillars of the Cecrops Eyed Silkmoth which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults in spring. Eggs are laid in rings on twigs of host plant. Early instar larvae are gregarious and feed in large groups, but they spread out and become solitary in later instars. Larvae are present in summer to early autumn. Overwinter as pupae in cocoons woven among (or incorporating) vegetation, mostly leaf litter on ground, sometimes on plants.”

Ah so – Thank You very much Daniel!

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeast Alabama,USA
Date: 09/13/2021
Time: 09:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Several eating rhododendron leaves
How you want your letter signed:  Duck

Azalea Caterpillar

Dear Duck,
This distinctive caterpillar is an Azalea Caterpillar,
Datana major, and according to BugGuide:  ” As the larva matures it becomes highly colored. Mature larvae are predominately black with a red last segment and eight broken yellow (occasionally white) lengthwise stripes. The head and legs are bright red.”

Subjec:  Black hornworm
Geographic location of the bug:  New Brunswick, Canada
Date: 09/08/2021
Time: 01:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Several of these in my driveway today. Black/brown shiny with red horn. Three inches long approx.
How you want your letter signed:  Alice

Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Alice,
This is a Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar, Hyles gallii, and here is a matching image on BugGuide.

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  New Brunswick Canada
Date: 09/01/2021
Time: 01:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My 5 year old found this sucker hanging out today
How you want your letter signed:  Curious kids

Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Curious Kids,
This is a Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, and according to Butterflies and Moths of North America:  “Fully-grown caterpillars pupate and overwinter in loose cocoons in shallow underground burrows.”  We suspect your individual was searching for a good location for pupation.