Subject:  Weird jumping bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix arizona
Date: 09/29/2021
Time: 02:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These hugs appeared in my back yard. They jump not fly. Worried they bite
How you want your letter signed:  Not a desert girl

Cricket

Dear Not a desert girl,
This is a Cricket.

Subject:  Please ID bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Long Island NY
Date: 09/26/2021
Time: 08:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this bug dead on my porch in Long Island, NY.
It is about 2.5 inches long.
Would you please let me know what type of bug this is?
Thank you very much!
How you want your letter signed:  Jim H.

Headless male Mantis

Dear Jim,
This is the body of a male Mantis, and considering that it is well documented that the female will eat the head of the male as he is mating with her.  Once he has initiated the mating and, if he is decapitated, he no longer has the instinct to escape danger, the coupling will continue for hours or possibly days.  We have images of decapitated male California Mantids mating in our archives.  Here is another.  We cannot be certain that a female Mantis caused this, it is our best guess, though we would not want to discount that there was another cause, possibly a predator.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much!!!
Take care,
Jim

Subject:  What’s this bug??
Geographic location of the bug:  East Los Angeles
Date: 09/28/2021
Time: 07:51 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Look at this guy! I think it’s high.
How you want your letter signed:  Dr. Greenthumb

Green Darner

Hey Dr. Greenthumb,
This awesome Dragonfly is a Green Darner.  There are many images of the male Green Darner using his anal claspers to grab the female by the neck during mating on the Natural History of Orange County website.  Dragonflies frequently rest on foliage, and your marijuana plant may have been the most convenient location for this individual to rest.  As to whether it got high, we cannot say, but we would never discount the possibility.

Subject:  Caterpillar ID
Geographic location of the bug:  SW North America (AZ desert)
Date: 09/28/2021
Time: 12:11 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this Sept, 27 early evening in New River, AZ (2,000 ft elevation).  I have not found anything like it in my searches.  The shiny silver barbs on its back come out when agitated.
How you want your letter signed:  DC

Possibly Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear DC,
This is a Silkmoth Caterpillar in the genus
Syssphinx, possibly a Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth Caterpillar.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Subject:  Bug on Cannabis
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/28/2021
Time: 02:19 PM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
While inspecting my maturing marijuana buds in anticipation of harvest, I noticed this solitary insect on one of my bugs.  Can you identify it for me?
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Lace Bug

Dear Constant Gardener,
This is a Lace Bug in the family Tingidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”  We did find a posting on Invasive.org of a Lace Bug and eggs on marijuana, and it contains the caption:  “Adult lace bug and eggs on the underside of a hemp leaf. Note: The nymphs failed to establish on the plant. ”  The University of California Pest Management System does not mention
Cannabis as a host plant.

Subject:  What’s this bug??
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern California (foothills near Los Angeles)
Date: 09/28/2021
Time: 05:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I’m trying to figure out if this bug is the reason my basil appears to be suffering. I’ve never seen one before! Know what it is? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Kristin

Bush Katydid Nymph

Dear Kristin,
This is an immature Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia, and you can verify our identification on BugGuide.  Katydids will eat leaves and flowers, but they do not feed enough to defoliate the plants.  You did not describe the malady affecting your basil.  If it is chewed leaves, you can probably blame the Bush Katydid nymph.  If it is brown spots, wilting or some other malady, look elsewhere for the culprit.

Thank you, Daniel! It is chewed leaves, which is a problem since that’s what I want to chew on basil! Haha. This was very helpful, I appreciate it!
Kristin DuFresne